James I of England

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
James I by Daniel Mytens, 1621

James I (VI of Scotland) was king of England and Scotland from 1603 until his death. He was the only son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a cousin of Elizabeth I. He was king during the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and the publishing of the King James Bible in 1611.

Sourced quotes

  • "A branch of the sin of drunkenness, which is the root of all sins."[1] Cscr-featured.svg   
Simple: A way of the sin of drunkenness, which is the root of all sins.
About the quote: From A Counterblaste to Tobacco.
  • "A custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black, stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless."[1]
Simple: A custom disgusting to the eye, hateful to the nose, bad for the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black, foul-smelling fume, which is just like the horrible hellish smoke of the endless pit.
About the quote: From A Counterblaste to Tobacco.
  • "No bishop, no King."[2]
What it means: If you have no bishop, you will get no protection from your king.
About the quote: To a group of Presbyterians from the Church of Scotland, asking to be allowed freedom of worship in England.
  • "The state of monarchy is the supremest thing upon earth; for kings are not only God's lieutenants upon earth, and sit upon God's throne, but even by God himself they are called gods."[2]
About the quote: Spoken to Parliament, 21 March 1610.
Simple: Monarchy is the most powerful thing on earth; for kings are not only God's guardians upon earth, and sit upon God's throne, but even God called them gods.
  • "The king is truly parens patriae, the politique father of his people."[2] Cscr-featured.svg   
Simple: The king is truly the father, the political father, of his people.
About the quote: Spoken to Parliament, 21 March 1610.
  • "I will govern according to the common weal, but not according to the common will."[3]
Simple: I will rule in line with the common good, but not in line with the common will.
About the quote: Spoken in December 1621.
  • "Dr Donne's verses are like the peace of God; they pass all understanding."[2]
Simple: Dr Donne's poems are like the peace of God; they are too much to understand.
About the quote: Noted by Archdeacon Plume.
  • "I made the carles lords, but who made the carlines ladies?"[4]
What it means: I gave the carles the title of lords, but who made the wives of the carles ladies?
About the quote: Attributed.
  • "You cannot name any example in any heathen author but I will better it in Scripture."[2]
Simple: You cannot name any example in any godless author but I will make it better in Scripture.
About the quote: Attributed in E. F. Rimbault (ed.) Miscellaneous Works of Sir Thomas Overbury (1856)

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 James I of England (1604). "A Counterblaste to Tobacco". Liberal Arts ITS. Retrieved on November 21
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 "James I" The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. Ed. Elizabeth Knowles. Oxford University Press, 2004. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. Accessed on 21 November 2008
  3. Green, bk. 7, ch. 4
  4. Grenville Murray, p. 201

References

  • Granville Murray, E., E. (1855). Embassies and Foreign Courts. London: G. Routledge & Co.
  • Green, J. R (1879). History of the English People. Dana Estes and Co.
  • James I of England (1604). "A Counterblaste to Tobacco". Liberal Arts ITS. Retrieved on November 21
  • "James I" The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. Ed. Elizabeth Knowles. Oxford University Press, 2004. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. Accessed on 21 November 2008

Other websites