Jim Starlin

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Jim Starlin

James P. "Jim" Starlin (born October 9, 1949) is an American comic book writer and artist, who has worked for Marvel Comics, DC Comics and others since the early 1970s. He is best known for "cosmic" tales that have the characters Captain Marvel, Adam Warlock, the Silver Surfer and a character he made himself, the evil character Thanos.

Sourced quotes

  • "I've made more money in novels than I did in my entire career in comics. The few years I did novels, they paid off so well, I don't have to be a slave to doing comics. But I'd rather do comics than novels. If I wanted to do it just for the money, I'd run off and do another novel. I just don't have the juice for it. I'm really not interested in it. It's a love for what this medium is."[1]
Simple: I've made more money in novels than I did in comics. The little time I did novels, they made a lot of money, I don't have to make comics. But I want to do comics more than novels. If I wanted a lot of money, I would have wrote another novel. I don't have the time or the focus to work on novels. I love comics.
  • "As big as an elephant is, a whale is still larger. Everything's relative. Even gods have their spot on the food chain."[2]
Simple: If an elephant is big, a whale is bigger. Everything is equal. Even gods are on the food chain.
About the quote: On the Death of the New Gods storyline.
  • "I’m still proudest of The Death of Captain Marvel followed closely by various Dreadstar] stories, Warlock, Kid Kosmos Kidnapped, The Thanos Quest and a series next-to-nobody ever read, called Wyrd, the Mystic Warrior..."[3]
Simple: I am really proud of The Death of Captain Marvel and my other favorites are the Dreadstar stories, Warlock, Kid Kosmos Kidnapped, The Thanos Quest and a series almost nobody ever read, called Wyrd, the Mystic Warrior
  • "When I finished with Captain Marvel I had turned him from a warrior into a mystic. Adam Warlock was a mystical messiah. Where to go from there? Decided to reverse course and turn him into a suicidal paranoid/schizophrenic, which was the way I was feeling at the time. I’ve always used my work to examine what is currently going on in my own life. It’s cheaper than going to a shrink. The Death of Captain Marvel was a great way of working through my own father’s death."[3]
Simple: When I finished with Captain Marvel I had changed him from someone who fights wars into someone who thinks about strange things. Adam Warlock was a messiah with strange ideas around him. I thought about what I would do next. I decided to go the other way. I changed him into a crazy person who thinks of killing himself, which was the way I was feeling then. I've always used my work to look at what's happening in my own life at the time. It costs less money than going to a psychiatrist. The Death of Captain Marvel was a great way of working through my feelings about my father's death.
  • "I’m a firm believer that in-depth subjects can be better handled in a fantasy setting. ... Let’s face it, traveling to some far off land is a terrific way to break the mold, to do something different. Isn’t that why we go on vacations?"[4]
Simple: I believe strongly that it's easier to look at complex topics using fantasy... Let's admit this: going to a place far away is a great way to break out of the usual pattern, to do something different. Isn't that why we go to other places when we have some time away from work?

References

  1. "And interview with Jim Starlin". ComicBookResources.com (July 28, 2000). Retrieved on November 20, 2008
  2. "Jim Starlin Kills The New Gods". Comicon.com (August 2007). Retrieved on November 20, 2008
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Interview at Newsarama" (July 15, 2006). Retrieved on November 20, 2008
  4. "Undated comment at his official site". Starlin.com. Retrieved on November 20, 2008

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